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Socionics Temperaments

Attempts have been made to describe the socionic types in terms of temperament. First, some socionists after Augusta correlated the four classical temperaments (melancholic, choleric, sanguine, and phlegmatic) with types, however, these attempts have not been widely accepted. The most well-known temperament system was introduced by Viktor Gulenko and puts the 16 types into four groups that share the same two traits of the extroversion / introversion and irrational / rational dichotomies. The same four intertype relations exist between the types of any temperament: identity, business, super-ego, and kindred. In Russian the temperament names consist of two adjectives that describe common characteristics of these types, while in English a different notation has been used:

  • EP temperament (Flexible-maneuvering)
  • EJ temperament (Linear-assertive)
  • IP temperament (Receptive-adaptive)
  • IJ temperament (Balanced-stable)

It should be noted that temperament in socionics has taken on a different meaning than in psychology. Compared to vague and abstract socionic concepts of temperament, temperament in psychology is defined more exactly, allowing for better empirical study.

Nevertheless, socionic temperaments can play an important role in recognizing similarities between types that are all in different quadras and clubs.

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IJ temperament

The IJ temperament, or balanced-stable temperament, was identified by Viktor Gulenko and includes the four rational introverts (one in each quadra): LII, LSI, ESI, and EII. Each of these types is also static.

Typical characteristics

  • calm, balanced and inert
  • "unflappable"
  • rigid but not very fast gait
  • may appear passive-aggressive
  • usually very stable mood
  • more reactive than active
  • little inclination to fidget during long periods of inactivity

IJs are both static and rational, so they see reality as mostly not changing and when it does, it's in abrupt "leaps" from one state to another. An IJ draws inner stability from a stable reality, especially as seen through his leading function. That makes him confident that things will probably remain as they are despite what he sees as minor disturbances; periods of clear upheaval are very disturbing and the individual is anxious that things will "settle down" one way or the other soon enough. As introverts, IJs tend to be calm and relaxed about initiating relationships with other people, mostly assuming that others will take the initiative, but will be more inclined to try to make sure a relationship is maintained once established.

IJs place great importance on maintaining and consistently following one's own principles and rules. An IJ will judge another person very harshly if the IJ deems that person has not consistently followed his/her own principles. If the IJ vocalizes this criticism, it will often be couched bluntly and unencumbered by diplomacy, as the offender's violation of principle(s) flies in the face of the IJs leading function, which dictates that one's actions be governed byhis/her own principals. A severe enough violation, in the eyes of the IJ, may cause the IJ to question or even terminate the relationship with the other person. (Note that IJs do not necessary expect others to share their same values, and they are generally comfortable with others who have opposing viewpoints, as long as they are based on consistent reasoning.)

Perception of other temperaments

EP: IJs see EPs as unreliable, and too unpredictable in their impulses and initiatives.

EJ: IJs see EJs as pleasantly energetic and willing to take the initiative and get things going in a balanced, constant way.

IP: IJs see IPs as unreliable and unwilling to take any initiative, with too low levels of energy.

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported This article incorporates text from Wikisocion.org.

EP temperament

The EP temperament, or flexible-maneuvering temperament, was identified by Viktor Gulenko and includes the four irrational extroverts (one in each quadra): ILE, SLE, SEE, and IEE. Each of these types is also static.

Typical characteristics

  • flexible
  • mobile
  • impulsive, shifting from apparent inactivity to bursts of energy, often several times a day, showing impatience during them
  • walk is energetic but "cat-like"
  • often seems optimistic and open-minded
  • entertains people easily and naturally
  • inclined to fidget when forced to remain inactive for long periods

EPs are both static and irrational, so they perceive reality as mostly not changing, and when it does, it's in abrupt "leaps" from one state to another. An EP is bothered by the lack of change, especially as seen through his leading function, since his personal preference is for change. That makes him impulsive, with sudden bursts of action, energy, or even just thought, as he tries to get his perceptions "moving". As extroverts, EPs tend to be feel that it is up to them to initiate contacts with other people, and EPs in particular tend to feel quite natural in that role.

EPs place significant value on generating ideas (Ne base) and volition (Se base). As such, EPs tend to view negatively others who appear limited or restricted in either their ability to exercise volition or their ability to accept or even consider other possibilities. Although this criticism can be leveled at any type, the types with the EP's leading information element in their vulnerable function appear more susceptible (i.e., their supervisee or conflictor).

Perception of other temperaments

EJ: EPs perceive EJs as active but too restless and nervous, slightly annoying due to a lack of sense of spontaneity.

IP: EPs perceive IPs as pleasantly flexible and responsive to their initiatives, sometimes too unpredictable but for that very reason never boring.

IJ: EPs perceive IJs as too predictable and boring, too unwilling to do things on the spur of the moment.

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported This article incorporates text from Wikisocion.org.

EJ temperament

The EJ temperament, or linear-assertive temperament, was identified by Viktor Gulenko and includes the four rational extroverts (one in each quadra): ESE, EIE, LIE, and LSE. Each of these types is also dynamic.

Typical characteristics

  • proactive
  • restless
  • difficult to relax unless tired
  • walk tends to be quick-paced and "purposeful", as well as stiff
  • "calmly energetic" with few intense variations in the level of energy during the day
  • inclined to fidget when forced to remain inactive for long periods

EJs are both dynamic and rational, so they see reality as in continuous, gradual, often imperceptible change. At the same time, an EJ has his own views of what reality "should" be. This inclines him to be quick to take action, normally using his leading function, in order to make sure things will remain, or become, as they should be, before change can get too far. As extroverts, EJs tend to feel that it is up to them to initiate contacts with other people, whether in the context of establishing or maintaining a relationship. They will not necessarily act on that, though, and sometimes wish others would take over this role.

EJs emphasize acting on external information. EJs will critically view others who the EJs perceive as having some type of information and not acting on it or applying it; EJs expect new information applied towards a productive purpose and question the capabilities of someone who has valuable information and doesn't use it. Although this criticism can be leveled at any type, it is often directed at IP types, particularly the person's supervisee and conflictor.

Perception of other temperaments

EP: EJs see EPs as unpredictable and moody, and therefore a bit irritating, but also as extremely energetic once they do focus on doing something, as well as the source of initiatives that may be worthwhile.

IP: EJs see IP as unpredictable, moody, as well as too passive and unreliable, especially if they are required to show initiative or even reciprocity.

IJ: EJs see IJs as solid, reliable, and reassuringly predictable, and usually not inclined towards being the first to take the initiative in taking action.

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported This article incorporates text from Wikisocion.org.

IP temperament

The IP temperament, or receptive-adaptive temperament, was identified by Viktor Gulenko and includes the four irrational introverts (one in each quadra): IEI, SEI, ILI, and SLI. Each of these types is also dynamic.

Typical characteristics

  • relaxed
  • go-with-the-flow
  • finds it easy to spend long periods of time in no activity, or at very low levels of energy
  • movements are flexible, unhurried
  • little inclination towards fidgetiness when having to remain inactive for longer periods

IPs are both dynamic and irrational, so they see reality as in continuous, gradual, often imperceptible change. An IP is soothed by this, seeing reality through his leading function. This leads to a relaxed inclination to take things as they come and adapt to them. As introverts, IPs tend to be relaxed and somewhat passive about initiating relationships with other people, mostly assuming that others will take the initiative.

IPs value the ability to be prepared for one's present (Si) and future (Ni) environment. They look down upon others who appear to not be cognizant and adapted to either the present situation and/or impending future possibilities (e.g., an SLI questioning someone going outside in freezing temperatures without a coat on). Although this criticism can be leveled at any type (including other IPs), it is often directed at EJs, particularly the person's supervisee and conflictor.

Perception of other temperaments

EP: IPs see EPs as pleasantly energetic in an unpredictable and therefore not boring way, also able to take for granted variations in levels of energy in others.

EJ: IPs see EJs as annoyingly pushy and insistent in their initiatives; they may respect their energy levels but also wonder if they don't see that a lot of that energy is spent wastefully to no good purpose.

IJ: IPs see IJs as boring and too concerned with stability.

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported This article incorporates text from Wikisocion.org.
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